Jump to the content zone at the center

TFAM showcases artworks by postwar women artists in East Asia

The Herstory of Abstraction in East Asia
Photo from TFAM
Left to right: exhibition curator Wang Pin-hua, Taipei Fine Arts Museum Director Lin Ping, and curator Moon Jung-hee at the July 20 opening of “The Herstory of Abstraction in East Asia.”
 
By Yali Chen
 
Taipei Fine Arts Museum (TFAM) is holding a special exhibition of abstract paintings by postwar women artists in East Asia.
 
The artworks came from the TFAM, National Museum of Modern Art in Tokyo, National Museum of Modern Art in Kyoto, 21st Century Museum of Contemporary Art in Kanazawa, and National Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art in Seoul.
 
Titled “The Herstory of Abstraction in East Asia”, the exhibition was curated by the two artists Moon Jung-hee of South Korea and Wang Pin-hua of Taiwan. It aims to present the similarities and dissimilarities in postwar abstract painting created in Taiwan, Japan and South Korea.
 
Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama’s “Accumulation of the Corpses” (center) at the TFAM
Photo from TFAM
Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama’s “Accumulation of the Corpses” (center) at the TFAM.
 
 
Japanese artist Atsuko Tanaka’s “Drawing after Electric Dress” (center) at the TFAM
Photo from TFAM
Japanese artist Atsuko Tanaka’s “Drawing after Electric Dress” (center) at the TFAM.

The Fifth Moon and Eastern Painting Groups were active in post-war Taiwan between 1956 and 1970. They were inspired by Abstract Expressionism in challenging traditional Chinese painting techniques.
 
In the 1950s, the artists of the Gutai group of Japan worked fast and fearlessly changed styles and mediums at will. They also stayed abreast of the latest postwar artistic developments abroad.
 
Taiwanese artist Chen Hsing-wan’s “The Sky Is A Sphere, the Earth Is A Square
Photo from TFAM
Taiwanese artist Chen Hsing-wan’s “The Sky Is A Sphere, the Earth Is A Square.”
 
Dansaekhwa (literally translated as “monochrome painting”) was a formidable movement formed in Korea in the 1950s. It stemmed from efforts to reconcile the influence of Western modernism on Korean artistic culture.
 
Korean artist Wook-kyung Choi’s “Experiment No.3
Photo from TFAM
Korean artist Wook-kyung Choi’s “Experiment No.3.”
 
The Herstory curators selected works by Japanese artists Yayoi Kusama, Atsuko Tanaka, Tatsuno Toeko, Ishikawa Yukie, and Tsugami Miyuki; Korean artists Wook-kyung Choi, Chang Sang-eui, Yang Kwangja, and Ahn Mija; as well as Taiwanese artists Yang Shih-chih, Chen Hsing-wan, Hsueh Pao-shia, and Hung Yi-chen.
 
During the 1950s, several of these artists began to find their places in the international art world. Yayoi Kusama moved to New York City in 1957. Wook-kyung Choi became the first Korean female artist to move to the U.S. in the sixties. Yang Shih-chih and Hsueh Pao-shia lived abroad to learn about the art culture that pervaded the 1970s and 1980s.
 
Highlights of the exhibition are Yayoi Kusama’s works in the early 1950s – “Accumulation of the Corpses,” “Untitled,” and “The Woman.” The three pieces from the National Museum of Modern Art in Tokyo were made by Kusama before she moved to New York.